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The most beautiful part of Marin Headlands

I've covered a lot of territory throughout Marin Headlands over many months. Today I had a spectacular 28+ mile sojourn which took me along the Alta Trail, down the Marincello trail to Tennessee Valley, then up the Wolf Ridge trail which connected to the Coastal Trail. The upper Wolf Ridge trail is spectacular.

I saw hazelnut (abundant along some parts of the trail and extremely rare throughout the rest of the Headlands), Monardella, an unusual yellow-flowered paintbrush, a Ceanothus with blossoms, Clinopodium douglasii (Yerba Buena, the only time I've ever seen in in the Headlands), and some other species not being IDed by iNaturalist that I haven't seen before.

This area is a botanical hot-spot and has probably been mostly undisturbed for centuries or millenia.

Wish I could at least post the pics here since I can't create observations in the iNaturalist Android app due to the location issue.

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por fpacifica fpacifica | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Unable to create observations due to GPS issue with iNaturalist Android app

The iNaturalist Android app is not accepting the GPS coordinates of many observation photos I've taken over the past couple weeks. I've taken a lot of amazing photos which I can't create observations from. Worse still, the app will not even allow me to manually input the GPS coordinates for observations.

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por fpacifica fpacifica | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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June 3rd, 2020

June 3rd, 2020 (Wednesday) 9:00 am – 11:00 am: no newts today! This is the second week with no newts.
It was very hot (heat advisory from Tuesday-Thursday). It was already 25C at 9 am. No rain in a while.
Other roadkills - no vertebrates, a few honey bees, ants, crickets, a scorpion, flies, true bugs, and many beetles: darkling beetles, a large Predaceous Diving Beetle, small ironclad beetles, and unknown beetles.
Coverage: north part - the county park parking lot till the second stop sign.
Rainfall: (MTD: 0 in; YTD: 21.77 in). Data from - http://www.weathercat.net/wxraindetail.php
Traffic: 10 truck, 25 cars, 15 bikes, 6 pedestrians.
All county park parking lots were open, no street parking near the first County Park parking lot.

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por merav merav | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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SA iNaturalists - May 2020 Update


This month we had 277 users upload 5,268 observations with 111 species observed for the first time, bringing our totals to 103,007 observations of 5,960 species.

Follow on from April, where the City Nature Challenge brought in almost twice as many new observers as a typical month, this month was a return to a more average 72 new observers in SA. The total observers in SA now stands at 1,975.

Many new observers have continued to contribute observation follow on from the City Nature Challenge. This month there were 277 individual observers, almost as many as there was last month which included the challenge.

Observations of Fungi are featuring heavily this year and especially this month. In May 2019 there were 64 Fungi observations. This May there have been 783 observations from 113 observers! Fungi even exceeded Bird observations this month.

Top 10 observers for the month: cobaltducks (758), davidsando (726), davemmdave (382), mtank (187), stephen169 (175), craigpolkinghorne (172), mendacott (140), basket_case (137), streglystendec (124) & belindacopland (96)

Top 10 identifiers of observations in SA for the month: cobaltducks (542), thebeachcomber (530), alan_dandie (500), ellurasanctuary (397), reiner (240), rfoster (169), rwl (164), alisonwalker (148), stephen169 (146) & konan_farrelly (110)








Observations Made in May 2020

Common Name Taxon Observations Species Most Observed This Month
Vertebrates
Birds Aves 781 141 28 x Trichoglossus moluccanus (Rainbow Lorikeet)
Mammals Mammalia 120 25 30 x Macropus fuliginosus (Western Grey Kangaroo)
Reptiles Reptilia 44 19 9 x Christinus marmoratus (Southern Marbled Gecko)
Amphibians Amphibia 17 6 8 x Crinia signifera (Common Eastern Froglet)
Ray-finned Fishes Actinopterygii 43 28 5 x Enoplosus armatus (Old Wife)
Cartilaginous Fishes Elasmobranchii 5 5 1 x Heterodontus portusjacksoni (Port Jackson Shark)
Insects
Flies Diptera 86 31 6 x Simosyrphus grandicornis (Yellow-shouldered Stout Hover Fly)
Dragonflies & Damselflies Odonata 22 5 12 x Hemicordulia tau (Tau Emerald)
Beetles Coleoptera 54 30 3 x Harmonia conformis (Large Spotted Ladybird)
Bees, Ants & Wasps Hymenoptera 96 29 8 x Apis mellifera (European Honey Bee)
Butterflies & Moths Lepidoptera 1488 89 32 x Danaus plexippus (Monarch)
Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids Orthoptera 26 15 3 x Phaulacridium vittatum (Wingless Grasshopper)
Earwigs Dermaptera 3 3 1 x Forficula auricularia (European Earwig).
Antlions, Lacewings, & Allies Neuroptera 3 2 1 x Dictyochrysa peterseni
Stick Insects Phasmida 2 1 1 x Ctenomorpha marginipennis (Margin-winged Stick Insect)
Barklice & Booklice Psocodea 4 1 1 x Psocidae sp.
Caddisflies Trichoptera 0 0 No observations this month
Cockroaches & Termites Blattodea 14 8 3 x Calolampra sp.
Mantises Mantodea 8 3 3 x Orthodera ministralis (Australian Green Mantis)
True Bugs, Hoppers & Aphids Hemiptera 42 20 5 x Rentinus dilatatus (Lantern Fly)
Other Animals
Mollusc Mollusca 168 77 10 x Sepia apama (Giant Australian Cuttlefish)
Echinoderms Echinodermata 18 13 3 x Coscinasterias muricata (Eleven-armed Sea Star)
Comb Jellies Ctenophora 0 0 No observations this month
Cnidarians Cnidaria 27 9 2 x Actinia tenebrosa (Waratah Anemone)
Bryozoans Bryozoa 6 3 2 x Triphyllozoon moniliferum
Sponges Porifera 33 6 3 x Tethya sp.
Flatworms Platyhelminthes 3 1 1 x Fletchamia sugdeni
Ribbon Worms Nemertea 1 1 1 x Baseodiscus delineatus
Hemichordates Hemichordata 0 0 No observations this month
Peanut Worms Sipuncula 0 0 No observations this month
Crustacean Crustacea 75 24 7 x Halicarcinus ovatus (Three-pronged Spider Crab)
Sea Squirts Tunicata 48 12 5 x Botrylloides perspicuus
Clitellates Clitellata 0 0 No observations this month
Polychaete Worms Polychaeta 7 4 2 x Nereididae sp.
Springtails Entognatha 2 1 1 x Hypogastruridae sp.
Sea Spiders Pycnogonida 0 0 No observations this month
Centipedes Chilopoda 5 4 2 x Cormocephalus sp.
Millipedes Diplopoda 8 2 4 x Ommatoiulus moreleti (Portuguese Millipede)
Spiders, Scorpions & Mites Arachnida 155 59 11 x Missulena occatoria (Red-headed Mouse Spider)
Plants
Red Algae Rhodophyta 6 3 1 x Plocamium cartilagineum (Sea Comb)
Green Algae Chlorophyta 5 4 1 x Codium fragile (Dead Man's Fingers)
Mosses Bryophyta 78 14 9 x Hypnum cupressiforme (Cypress-leaved Plait-Moss)
Liverworts Marchantiophyta 35 5 12 x Chiloscyphus sp.
Hornworts Anthocerotophyta 0 0 No observations this month
Flowering Plants: Dicots Magnoliopsida 1,548 373 51 x Eucalyptus fasciculosa (Pink Gum)
Flowering Plants: Monocots Liliopsida 279 84 16 x Acianthus pusillus (Small Mosquito Orchid)
Conifers Pinopsida 13 7 4 x Callitris gracilis (Slender Cypress-Pine)
Ferns Polypodiopsida 47 8 21 x Pteridium esculentum (Austral Bracken)
Other Kingdoms
Bacteria Bacteria 1 1 1 x Rivularia firma
Protozoans Protozoa 4 3 2 x Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa
Kelp & Diatoms Chromista 22 7 6 x Hormosira banksii Neptune's Necklace)
Fungi Fungi 783 124 43 x Amanita muscaria (Fly Agaric)


(Data used for this post taken on the 4th of June. It excludes any observations from May that were uploaded after this date)

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por cobaltducks cobaltducks | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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3 days left in the #NatureNearYou challenge!

It's the last weekend of the #NatureNearYou Challenge. To help keep you inspired here’s some mini challenges to get you outside and exploring all the weird & wonderful #NatureNearYou this weekend.

Can you discover all the things that:
- are food - how many predator and prey species can you find?
- can fly
- creep & crawl
- come out at night
- are brightly colored or furry
- live under rocks or in the soil

We’ve loved seeing all the awesome pics you’ve posted so far. We can't wait to see what you else you find!
- Carmen, ACF.

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por carmensm carmensm | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Native seedlings in each zone or specific location

As the native seedling observations have become more numerous, we can begin to compare the results in various sites within Gahnia Grove, eg the Arena.

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por kaipatiki_naturewatch kaipatiki_naturewatch | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Welcome to the Edmonton Biodiversity Challenge 2020

Hi Edmonton;
This informal challenge is to see how many nature observations and different species can be found in the city of Edmonton, during the 4-day period from June 11 - 14, 2020.
This is an iNaturalist -based informal alternative to the official "Edmonton BiodiverCity Challenge", which uses a different observation recording app. I'm not trying to compete, I just wanted to be able to use iNaturalist instead, and I know there are others like me who are more comfortable with iNat.
Welcome aboard! It starts after midnight next Wednesday night (00:01 AM June 11), and goes until midnight Sunday night (24:00 June 14). Let's see what other creatures we share our city with!

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por gpohl gpohl | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Local Plant flowering seasonality

Starting to compile a list of local plants (mostly that I haven't seen yet) and the best time and place to go looking for them.

JANUARY

* Bauera capitata (Summer, wet heath on deep sand; Red Rock heath)
* Melaleuca thymifolia (Summer, Red Rock heath)
* Spiranthes australis (Nov-Apr, Coramba-Lowanna, marshy or boggy places, paddocks)

FEBRUARY

MARCH

* Centratherum riparium (Summer-Autumn, Roadsides/paddocks, forest; Sherwood)
* Comesperma sphaerocarpum (Feb-Mar, Red Rock)

APRIL

MAY

* Dillwynia floribunda (May, Red Rock)
* Pterostylis hispidula (Mar-July, moist areas of dry sclerophyll /wet sclerophyll forest, coastal; poss. Coffs crk) http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Pterostylis~hispidula

JUNE

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

* Boronia falcifolia (Aug-Oct, Grows in heath in damp sandy sites; Red Rock)
* Boronia umbellata (Aug-Nov, in `scrub' in the Coffs Harbour district; Bucca)
* Romulea rosea (Aug-Oct, A common weed of pastures, lawns and roadsides) http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Romulea~rosea

OCTOBER

* Aneilema acuminatum (Aug-Jan, rainforest or tall sclerophyll forest; Woolgoolga R/forest)
* Diuris alba (Aug-Nov, Grows among grass in sclerophyll forest; Yaraygir NP)
* Zieria laxiflora (Aug-Nov, coastal heath / inland swamp; Arrawarra)

NOVEMBER

* Bauera rubioides (Spring-summer but some all year, wet and often shaded situations; Red Rock heath)
* Freesia laxa (Oct-Dec, disturbed ground, along roadsides etc; Smoky Cape campground)
* Scaevola ramosissima (Aug-Mar, heath and sclerophyll forest usually on sandy soils; Sherwood)
* Thelymitra pauciflora (Aug-Jan, sclerophyll forest, woodland and heath; Arrawarra)

DECEMBER

* Dianella congesta (Spring-summer, coastal sand dunes; Sandy Beach)
* Goodenia rotundifolia (Sept-May, sclerophyll woodland and forest; Darkum Headland)
* Pseudovanilla foliata (Oct-Jan, rainforest/moist sites near streams/sheltered gullies in sclerophyll forest, on trees, stumps and rotting logs; North from Kempsey)
* Tristaniopsis collina (Dec-Jan, rainforest margins and moist situations in sclerophyll forest; Ulong)

ALL YEAR (or most of year)

* Tricoryne elatior (Common Nov-Dec, Woolgoola headland)

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por nicklambert nicklambert | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Getting ready to BLITZ!!!

Hey Madison County BIOBLITZERS!!!
I am very excited to get started BioBlitzing on Saturday. I think with a great group effort we could observe, identify and catalog hundreds of species, significantly contributing to the scientific knowledge of our home and the world. Thanks to all who have helped us along, the Friends of the Mars Hill Library, Friends of the Hot Springs Library, the Madison County Friends, The Madison County Public Library System and our partner MountaiunTrue. I am excited that we can do this together even during difficult times. This BioBlitz is not just a record of living things, it's a record of one of the things our community did in 2020: we came together to study and explore the natural world.
Pete Dixon
Madison Natural Heritage
Madison County Public Library Trustee

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por peteeliot peteeliot | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Getting ready to BLITZ!!!

Hey Madison County BIOBLITZERS!!!
I am very excited to get started BioBlitzing on Saturday. I think with a great group effort we could observe, identify and catalog hundreds of species, significantly contributing to the scientific knowledge of our home and the world. Thanks to all who have helped us along, the Friends of the Mars Hill Library, Friends of the Hot Springs Library, the Madison County Friends, The Madison County Public Library System and our partner MountaiunTrue. I am excited that we can do this together even during difficult times. This BioBlitz is not just a record of living things, it's a record of one of the things our community did in 2020: we came together to study and explore the natural world.
Pete Dixon
Madison Natural Heritage
Madison County Public Library Trustee

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por peteeliot peteeliot | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Japanese Pachysandra

This plant is low to the ground. It has spread over the area within 3 years. The leaves are hardy and shiny. I want to go and measure the height for the plant and also pay closer attention to the leaves.

Ingresado el 04 de junio de 2020 por siliezard siliezard | 1 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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One Thousand Observations!

With my additions yesterday, the number of observations for this Project has passed the 1,000 mark ... thanks to everyone who has contributed!
The Project is also currently the leader in number of species identified amongst the Onkaparinga Coastal group of projects - see https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/projects/onkaparinga-coastal-projects.
That's not to say this area has a greater range of species than other parts of the coast, but the reef at Sellicks Beach seems to be a particularly rich source of organisms. That and the propensity for marine creatures to be washed ashore from the reef during stormy weather makes my daily walks endlessly interesting.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por wamoz wamoz | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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ecosystems

Ecosystems
Niches

Healthy soil is complicated – a matrix of organic matter, minerals, moisture, living organisms and more in relationships that work together. It's an ecosystem within an ecosystem. Clearly plants are the basic building block of visible life, but soil is the building block of plants (plus energy – sun). There's so much in the soil that doesn't come thru in texture or even soil tests. I've been digging in the dirt to plant almost 2 dozen native plants this week that I ordered. They were categorized under 3 categories: 1. Spring ephemerals – a temporal distinction, had to consider the neighbor plants. Ok if it neighbored with big sunblocking plants as long as they grow or leaf out later than the early Spring. Seemed to be found mostly in woodlands. I don't have woods, so I clustered them in a mini woodland. They aren't dead (good news) but you don't know if a plant really likes where you put it until the next year. Fingers crossed.
2. moisture loving – wetland. I do have that. If the description didn't say 'tolerates peat conditions” I added some additional soil, but otherwise I'm thinking they will love it in a corner of my yard. Again, fingers crossed. 3. summer sun – plants that love sun. I've got places for them. Loamy soil seemed right, we'll see. 1 died because I broke it at the base of the stem while planting. It's a bulb type plant though and might survive – again, we'll see. Another 2 have had flowers eaten by rabbits. Ok, we'll see.

Did I find a niche for each of my plants? I checkin with them daily, mostly so far so good. We'll see, fingers crossed.

As for me, I knew what my niche was when I worked. Increasingly, my niche is to live and adopt a lifestyle with some nature balance. I eat mostly plants. I try to grow some of what I eat. I'm trying to put a lifelong history of killing plants behind me (no natural green thumb here). I'd like to share part of my yard with wild life. I am home at sea level oxygen levels, trees, winter, temperate zones.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por maryjb maryjb | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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The juvenile eastern newt, or red eft

Of all the plants and lichens and mosses and creatures that I have observed this week, the red eft is top of mind in terms of adaptation. I climbed Wachusett mountain at 8:30am the morning after a good rain, and I saw 70 of them on the path. (Yes I counted!) (But I only took one picture.)

They are small and bright orange, and must be easily visible to a variety of predators. I also wondered where they were all traveling to. So I did some sleuthing. (Meaning I read the Wikipedia article.)

Here’s what I learned.

  • The eastern newt produces tetrodotoxin, which makes the species unpalatable to predatory fish and crayfish. (example of adaptation)
  • Eastern newts have three stages of life: the aquatic larva or tadpole, the red eft or terrestrial juvenile stage, and the aquatic adult.
  • The red eft (juvenile) stage is a bright orangish-red, with darker red spots outlined in black. An eastern newt's time to get from larva to eft is about three months. During this stage, the eft may travel far, acting as a dispersal stage from one pond to another, ensuring outcrossing in the population. (example of adaptation)
  • The striking coloration of this stage is an example of aposematism — or "warning coloration" — which is a type of antipredator adaptation in which a "warning signal" is associated with the unprofitability of a prey item (i.e., its toxicity) to potential predators. (example of adaptation)
  • After two or three years, the eft finds a pond and transforms into the aquatic adult.
  • Eastern newts are at home in both coniferous and deciduous forests. (like Wachusett mountain) Red efts may often be seen in a forest after a rainstorm. Adults prefer a muddy aquatic habitat, but will move to land during a dry spell. Eastern newts have some amount of toxins in their skin, which is brightly colored to act as a warning. Even then, only 2% of larvae make it to the eft stage. Some larvae have been found in the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Sarracenia purpurea. (part of its role in the ecosystem)
  • Eastern newts eat a variety of prey, such as insects, small mollusks and crustaceans, young amphibians, worms, and frog eggs. (part of its role in the ecosystem)
Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por janezupan janezupan | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Ecosystems

These past few days I have been studying different parts of ecosystems and different kinds. Yesterday I traveled to Rutland and studied the habitat there along the river. The forest overlapped into a meadow, the meadow overlapped into a swampy area which the river flowed into. They are all so interconnected that understanding the difference between ecosystem and habitat has been difficult for me but I think I am getting closer to understanding. There were Common yellow throats singing that were mostly in the bushes along the edge of the water but would sometimes fly into the pine trees and sing from there instead. There were also yellow warblers hunting and singing in the bushes near the water. Sometimes I would see a grub in their beak and watched in fascination as they would lightly toss it into the air to catch in their beak, other times they seemed to slurp it up like spaghetti. There was an alder flycatcher flying back and forth, swiveling in midair to catch the small insects that filled the air alongside the darting tree swallows and barn swallows. The bullfrogs in the stream were hunting the dragonflies, water striders and there were whirligwigs but I am unsure if they were eating those as well. There was so much to see there that I can not cover it here.
Today I went back to Dennison and there were signs of beaver, and were blue headed vireos,warbling vireos, common yellowthroats, yellow warblers, gray catbirds, eastern kingbird, ovenbirds, common grackles, red winged blackbirds, crows and ravens. I saw the pair of bald eagles and one dove into the water and seemed to catch a brook trout. There were two grackles bombarding the eagle as it tried to eat its prey in peace. There was also a chickadee excavating a nest hole.
So much life, so much to see, all you have to do and stop and be. What a beautiful day!!!

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por jobird jobird | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Native seedlings in each zone or specific location

As the native seedling observations have become more numerous, we can begin to compare the results in various sites within Gahnia Grove, eg the Arena.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por kaipatiki_naturewatch kaipatiki_naturewatch | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Texas Panhandle Gathering -- iNaturalist is a tool of engagement!

We had it on the books for about a year... I was hoping to see folks from all around gathering together in the Texas Panhandle for our annual spring iNat TX gathering/bioblitz. Alas, a global pandemic is a curve ball that I didn't really expect, and the gathering was a bit more 'socially distant' (hugs were officially outlawed!)... Nonetheless, a good group of naturalists gathered at Matador and Gene Howe Wildlife Management Areas and documented a whole slew of organisms. It really was wonderful -- these things make me tremendously happy.

About 17 folks got together on May 29th at Matador WMA. We literally had 28,000 acres to explore, almost just to ourselves! Several folks got there a bit earlier than I did (I arrived at around 3:30) to do some exploring beforehand. That evening, we did some blacklighting close to headquarters area. Lots of stuff showed up to the lights! We also had around 8 stations, so we could stay a bit apart while we mothed. I got to do a little camping as well (which, I need to do this more often...).
We explored Matador again on May 30th -- most of the exploration was solo. This was a bit different than some of the gatherings of the past where we went out as small groups or so. We gathered again at noon at the campsite for some lunch and conversation.
In the evening, we cooked up some hot dogs (tradition, I suppose) and conversed about the afternoon findings. We blacklighted closer to the river this night to see if some different insects would show up.

In the morning, some of us went up to Gene Howe WMA. This was a relatively unexplored spot on iNaturalist, so it'll be nice to see some observations get added here! We 'gathered' at noon and then again in the evening to do some blacklighting close to headquarters. The panhandle has a bit of wind during the day, but it really does die down after sunset. So many cool insects showed up at the blacklights.

I hope that one of the big products that this trip accomplishes is some digital vouchers for the biodiversity at these spots. I hope that others recognize that these wildlife management areas are refuges for countless species -- the management practices there provide just the habitat that all of these organisms need. Through this bioblitz/gathering, we'll help with the ever growing species guide to the specific areas. We've got loads to still upload, but it's impressive so far:
Species at Matador WMA
Species at Gene Howe WMA
Hopefully we'll all get our observations up in a few weeks... hint hint. ;)

Throughout this whole time, I so enjoyed engaging with both nature and with my fellow naturalists. I think that's exactly what iNaturalist does to us. We learn more about nature, we seek it out, we document it, find new stuff, etc... but we also engage with each other. Sometimes, as in this case, it was a physical engagement with each other (except at a little bit of a distance), but it also happens online when we see what nature others see. That's a wonderful thing, and man, does it make me happy. :) We greatly missed those of you that weren't able to join us, but please know that you were there in spirit!

Next early spring, let's think about west TX!!! :) We had some fun discussion about Elephant Mountain WMA and Big Bend Ranch State Park, and there are some really nice Nature Conservancy spots there too. If we do West TX, we'd probably gather around mid April (dates TBD, of course).

iNaturalist is a tool of engagement! :)

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por sambiology sambiology | 9 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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2020 Karner Surveys

Hello Karner Volunteers,
The Wisconsin DNR continues to follow the State of Wisconsin’s Badger Bounce Back Plan for the health and well-being of all Wisconsinites. Phase 1 of the plan limits the size of in-person gatherings, and many June events will be canceled, including the upcoming Karner Volunteer Trainings.

We will still be accepting observations via iNaturalist but will not be holding in person trainings this year. Please check your email for details.

Feel free to contact me with any questions!

Thank you!
Chelsea

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por chelseaweinzinger chelseaweinzinger | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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The Bees of June

Spring often arises with a buzz in the air. After a winter devoid of humming pollinators, they suddenly seem to burst from every flowering shrub and clump of grass. Bees zipping among flowers must rank up next to bird song as one of the most celebrated signs of spring.

As spring begins to fade into summer, bee diversity shifts. In fact, June is a slow month for northeastern bee diversity—most of the spring specialists have come and gone, many bumble bee queens are underground laying eggs, and a majority of workers won’t appear in significant numbers until the end of the month.

Of course, there are still plenty of bees to find, and several genera appear for the first time in June. Visit the VAL website to learn more.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por emilyanderson2 emilyanderson2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Salt Marsh Caterpillars

On Sunday, May 31, 2020, I happened upon dozens of salt marsh moth larvae. According to Wikipedia,
"The larva, known as the salt marsh caterpillar, which grows to about 5 cm (2 in) in length, is highly variable in color, ranging from pale yellow to rusty orange brown to dark brownish black. It is hairy, with numerous soft setae, growing in tufts (several tufts on each segment), with a few individual hairs that are longer toward the end of the body. The thoracic and abdominal segments have a few rows of orange or black warts, and it has one tiny white dot per segment, on both sides of its body."

I found them on the following six plants (in order of frequency):
* Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum)
* Broadleaved Pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium)
* Bindweeds (Genus Convolvulus)
* Armenian Blackberry (Rubus armeniacus)
* Stinking Chamomile (Anthemis cotula)
* Shortpod Mustard (Hirschfeldia incana)

There were so many different sizes, colors, and patterns of these delightful caterpillars, that I went a little hog-wild in photographing them, but I don't know when I'll see them again.

Reference:
https://bugguide.net/index.php?q=search&keys=Estigmene+acrea&search=Search

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por truthseqr truthseqr | 18 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Observation of the Day

This is our second day of our iNaturalist challenge and we are getting some really great observations!

This observation had two suggested IDs. Want to help out? go to the observation and let us know what you think: www.inaturalist.org/observations/48354140





Join the challenge today! www.inaturalist.org/projects/willow-bend-nature-challenge

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por moranhenn moranhenn | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Observation of the Day

This is the second day of our iNaturalist challenge and we are already getting some awesome observations.
Have you seen this flower around?Can you ID it?
Here is one suggestion: Fleabanes and Horseweeds - Genus Erigeron

Go to www.inaturalist.org/observations/48349013 to help ID it.





Haven't joined the challenge yet? go to www.inaturalist.org/projects/willow-bend-nature-challenge

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por moranhenn moranhenn | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Maps, Dates

It's been awhile since I made a blog post. I don't think anybody reads them, so really they are an open notebook. Here are some things I've learned since last I posted.

1. Mapping observations is quite helpful. I noticed some conspicuous holes in my observations, and made a point to get to those locations and see what I'd been missing. For example, I noticed I hadn't logged any observations from a little sand ridge in the middle of the Lena Park Cabin woods. My trips there were rewarded both with some interesting observations, but also with a sense that this section is one of the less disturbed portions of the property.

2. Searching "your observations" is a useful practice. Often I photograph something I've observed and recorded previously, but don't remember the exact name. By specifying what I do remember and an approximate season (e.g. "Diptera" and "May or June") it's easy to make a query that generates a manageable list to scan through. For example, when I photographed an unfamiliar potter wasp this spring, I wondered if it was from a genus I hadn't previously recorded. Looking at the list of all potter wasps I'd observed in May and June, it was quickly obvious that it was a new genus for me, and after some looking I concluded it was Symmorpha. I tagged Heather Holm, and she was able to get it to species - Symmorpha canadensis. Not just new for me, but the first for Indiana.

So I'm still pretty much smitten by the iNat interface. All for now.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por martinlucas martinlucas | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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These Black nature lovers are busting stereotypes, one cool bird at a time.

These young Black naturalists -- and the birds they love -- are some of the stars of Black Birders Week, a series of events and activities designed to highlight Black scientists, scholars and everyday nature lovers. While spreading their joy and knowledge, the countless people involved in the movement are also raising visibility of Black achievement at a painfully critical time.

https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/06/03/us/black-birders-week-black-in-stem-christian-cooper-scn-trnd/index.html

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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"Гербарий 2.0" школьникам!

Дорогие друзья!

Проект "Практики для будущего" дошёл до ботаники. Подробности здесь: https://practicingfutures.org/botany

За мудрёными названиями организаторов скрываются живые люди - сотрудники кафедры экологии и географии растений МГУ. Этот проект на iNaturalist здесь: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/gerbariy-2-0 . Сегодня произошло удивительное событие - из-за "необъяснимого" активного притока новых пользователей, которые пока не сделали наблюдений, этот проект на несколько часов стал недоступным (был помечен как спам).

Но проект на iNaturalist - это только верхушка большой работы, которая будет вестись со школьниками по этой программе в рамках "Образовательного марафона". Мы будем учить ребят азам фотодокументации растений, рассказывать об особенностях флоры в разных местах, давать советы. Если кто-то из ребят останется на iNaturalist, то это будет большим достижением для нас.

Кое-что в соцсетях для изучения и репостов:
https://vk.com/practicing_futures?w=wall-182343311_874
https://vk.com/kunzm?w=wall-564707_1327/all
https://vk.com/kruzhok_nti?w=wall-156943811_2327
https://mobile.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=4185894934768880&id=566680650023678&_rdc=1&_rdr

Организаторы: https://kruzhok.org и https://practicingfutures.org

Все вопросы задавайте в сообщениях Валентине Бородулиной (@valentinaborodulina )

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por apseregin apseregin | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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BioBlitz Opening Event

It's exciting to officially open the bioblitz - we are hosting a virtual event, which you can join at: https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/rq77cd0scjl1/. If you have already contributed to the project, THANK YOU, and please keep on adding observations! Also sending a "Welcome!" to new observers and looking forward to what you find.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por sstaats sstaats | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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GUIDE :: Fuzzy Oak Galls

Adding this link here...to reference when I'm trying to identify fuzzy oak galls on North American Oaks.

https://www.inaturalist.org/guides/11769

A guide created by @megachile on Fuzzy Galls on North American Oaks (not including CA).

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por catttailsandcobwebs catttailsandcobwebs | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Ecosystems

I spent some time sitting by a large pond that has the following plants, cattails, some sedge species, water reeds, duckweed and a weeping willow a few yards from the waters edge. Within the pond, there were the following creatures; bullfrog adults, bullfrog tadpoles, green frog adults, painted turtles at varying ages, mallard ducks, water beetles and damselflies. Some birds that were flying around included many male redwing blackbirds, some female redwing blackbirds, tree swallows and a northern flicker. The blackbirds were landing on the pond reeds and picking at the base presumably eating some tasty pond dwelling insects. I sit and watch and I learn. Many questions are answered this way. The tadpoles demostrated a behavior where they chew the algae off of the water plants and then swim to the surface of the water and gulp air. Im wondering if this behavior is part of the transition into the air-breathing life stage. Either way, it was fascinating to watch.

Several yards next to the pond lies an open field that constitutes wild native plants as well as birds and small mammals. Grass is cut in a path to allow guests to the park area to walk freely within the filed habitat. This path cuts through into a dense forest where the habitat changes yet again. These habitats are also adjacent to an agricultural field that is cultivated for crops. The wide open cropland offers a clearcut edge habitat. Deer tracks and trails were present along the border. Being on the border offers a food source from the agricultural field as well as immediate cover from potential predators.

Keeping these biological habitats in mind can be strung together with the anthropogenic and abiotic factors which help make up an ecosystem. The biotic systems and abiotic aspects come together when the park is open and people are spending time near the pond and walking on the trails. People are experiencing the natural world, curious children are trying to catch frogs with long butterfly nets, adults are jogging on the trails and walking their dogs and some are readIng quietly underneath a shady tree. The interactions that are made every day demonstrates the interconnectedness of the surrounding environment.

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por sophie342 sophie342 | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Monthly Award Categories

As scientists, we strive to produce quality work, and collect data that can be used for research purposed. Thus, we have created our award categories to encourage students to collect data that will improve upon citizen-science projects such as iNaturalist. We will be announcing at the end of each month the top Student Chapter and individual in each of the following categories:

Student Chapter:
1) Most identifications
2) Most research grade observations
3) Most species

Individual Members:
1) Most identifications
2) Most research grade observations
3) Most species

Ingresado el 03 de junio de 2020 por tws_sdwg tws_sdwg | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Vida Silvestre es una entidad asociada a la Organización Mundial de Conservación