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Covid 19

Hi,

So I know we are all quarantined, but that doesn’t mean you cant take photos of birds hanging out in your yard or at your feeder. We are at 4k observations and 223 birds, which is amazing for the first 3 months of the year. I would be happy to see us get 20k observations by the end of the year and 350 species.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por chrisleearm chrisleearm | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Publix Saves a Giant Katydid

The LaBelle Plaza Publix in Clearwater, Florida, used to be a hotspot for all things katydid. And an undeveloped and unsprayed lot with large oak trees and open swaths of grass created a habitat uncommon in this part of Pinellas . The bright white lights under the portico attracted conehead, anglewing-type and giant katydids. But that was about to change

In January, the owners of the lot began clearing to make way for a condominium development Old live oaks and grass fell under land-clearing machines. . Shortly after the clearing and during an early morning store run, I noticed a Giant Katydid way up on the ceiling of the portico. I think they make great pets so I wanted him. But he was 20 feet above my head.

I asked for a manager inside the store so see if they could help me get him. I figured they'd probably tell me no. But Jeff was a great sport and decided to help me. He got a long pole used for fetching lost balloons then taped a feather duster to the end. Jeff lifted the pole and gently perched the insect on the feather duster. When he brought it down, I was able to guide the katydid into a container.

The katydid's emerald green wing covers were badly damaged, presumably from his escape. He seemed fine other than that.

He started eating meals of romaine lettuce. And in spite of his wing injuries, I hear occasional the occasional song--an explosive ZEEEEET! His name is General Grievous, after the Star Wars character.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por lizch lizch | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Geelong Region -CNC Prelude update

A halfway update on the prelude competition. we have just clicked over 100 iNaturalist users contributing at least one observation. We would hope to sign up a further 200 people by Earth day and hopefully all will be involved in the City Nature Challenge occurring over the ANZAC long weekend.

The Surf Coast remains the leading area in terms of observation and Bellarine has the most observers. Details at https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/projects/cnc-geelong-regions

That could all change as people start recording more species in their backyard.
When out, please ensure social distancing and continue to maintain good hygiene practices.
https://citynaturechallenge.org/covid19/
https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/31664-exploring-nature-when-you-re-stuck-at-home

Regards Rod

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por rodl rodl | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Geelong Region -CNC Prelude update

A halfway update on the prelude competition. we have just clicked over 100 iNaturalist users contributing at least one observation. We would hope to sign up a further 200 people by Earth day and hopefully all will be involved in the City Nature Challenge occurring over the ANZAC long weekend.

The Surf Coast remains the leading area in terms of observation and Bellarine has the most observers. Details at https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/projects/cnc-geelong-regions

That could all change as people start recording more species in their backyard.
When out, please ensure social distancing and continue to maintain good hygiene practices.
https://citynaturechallenge.org/covid19/
https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/31664-exploring-nature-when-you-re-stuck-at-home

Regards Rod

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por rodl rodl | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Geelong Region - CNC Prelude update

A halfway update on the prelude competition. we have just clicked over 100 iNaturalist users contributing at least one observation. We would hope to sign up a further 200 people by Earth day and hopefully all will be involved in the City Nature Challenge occurring over the ANZAC long weekend.

The Surf Coast remains the leading area in terms of observation and Bellarine has the most observers. Details at https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/projects/cnc-geelong-regions

That could all change as people start recording more species in their backyard.
When out, please ensure social distancing and continue to maintain good hygiene practices.
https://citynaturechallenge.org/covid19/
https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/31664-exploring-nature-when-you-re-stuck-at-home

Regards Rod

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por rodl rodl | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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It's Finally Spring!

What a heck of a month its been! Being an essential worker in retail has been a heck of a time. It's been an emotional whirlwind.
Taking a little break at the moment, trying to get over an illness.
I stepped outside yesterday, and realized it was warm! Somewhere between here and February, Spring finally came along! So I turned on my black light last night, and managed to get a few visitors! I'm so excited to start a new mothing season!
I'm also going to try to go on a short walk within the next week to photograph wildflowers. It's that time of year again, and I can't get behind on my Claytonia observations!
I hope everyone is safe and well, and getting through this crazy time!
-Ash

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por dreadhorn dreadhorn | 6 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Первые озерные чайки

28.03.2020, г.Киров, наблюдатели @anisimov-43 и @timik_0896

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por anisimov-43 anisimov-43 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Новый участник клуба "50 наблюдений за птицами Кировской области"

Сегодня участница проекта "Птицы Кировской области" @vyatka перешагнула порог 50 наблюдений за все время (на сегодня добавлено 79 видов). Благодаря загруженным архивам в проекте прибавилось 4 вида птиц - ушастая сова, обыкновенная горлица, воронок и белощекая крачка.

От всей души поздравляем @vyatka с этим событием и ждем в клубе-100

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por anisimov-43 anisimov-43 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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20 участников и 2000 наблюдений

Сегодня замечательный день - в проекте "Птицы Кировской области" появился двадцатый участник. Также у нас десятый наблюдатель за птицами на территории региона с начала года. Но самое приятное - мы перешагнули порог в 2000 наблюдений птиц на территории области за все время. Поздравляю всех участников с этим историческим событием. Праздничная статистика: На 28.03.2020 2058 - НАБЛЮДЕНИЙ, 171 - ВИД, 306 - ЭКСПЕРТОВ, 20 - НАБЛЮДАТЕЛЕЙ. Топ наблюдателей:
Место Наблюдатель Наблюдений Видов
1 @elena-votinceva 411 129
2 @anisimov-43 1252 125
3 @woodmen19 234 88
4 @vyatka 88 79
Топ видов:
Позиция Вид Количество наблюдений
1 Большая Синица (Parus major) 114
2 Серая Ворона (Corvus cornix) 91
3 Снегирь (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) 87
4 Обыкновенный Клёст (Loxia curvirostra) 79
5 Кряква (Anas platyrhynchos) 72
6 Полевой Воробей (Passer montanus) 66
7 Европейская Сорока (Pica pica) 63
8 Дрозд-Рябинник (Turdus pilaris) 61
9 Большой Пёстрый Дятел (Dendrocopos major) 58
10 Обыкновенная Зеленушка (Chloris chloris) 53
11 Чечётка Обыкновенная (Acanthis flammea) 52
Наш регион в проекте "Птицы регионов России" (82 региона) По количеству наблюдений - 13 место (-1) По количеству видов - 20 место (-2) По количеству наблюдателей - 40 место (+5) Благодарю @kildor за замечательный конвертер - https://kildor.name/react/inat-converter/
Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por anisimov-43 anisimov-43 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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The Rite of Spring: Amphibian Migration

This is a great time of year to document any amphibian species along the Maple Highlands Trail. Watch out for them especially on warm, rainy days since they may be crossing the trail. Please photo-document any that you see in your travels. Happy spring, everyone!

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por lgilbert lgilbert | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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El Género Centris en Chile, lo componen las siguientes especies (Catálogo de Abejas de Chile de Ruz y Montalva-2010)

Son una docena de especie Centris la registradas para este género en Chile:
Centris buchholzi Herbst, 1918
Centris chilensis (Spinola, 1851)
Centris cineraria Smith, 1854
Centris escomeli Cockerell, 1926
Centris mixta Friese, 1904
Centris moldenkei Toro y Chiappa, 1989
Centris nigerrima (Spinola, 1851)
Centris orellanai Ruiz, 1940
Centris rhodophthalma Pérez, 1911
Centris tamarugalis Toro y Chiappa, 1989
Centris toroi Zanella, 2002
Centris unifasciata (Schrottky, 1913)
De las cuales,a través de la Ciencia Ciudana de Inat, aporto las siguientes especies:
- Centris chilensis :https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/37209609
- Centris orellanai : https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35678918
- Centris nigerrima : https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35678185
- Centris cinearia : https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35679993

Aquí, el catálogo: http://www.insectachile.cl/rchen/pdfs/2010v35/Montalva_Ruz_2010.pdf

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por orlandomontes orlandomontes | 4 observaciones | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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March 25th: Social Behavior and Phenology

I went out on March 21st, it was a bitterly cold day out ranging just below freezing. There wasn't any precipitation but it was windy and cloudy out. I walked to Centennial woods from east ave down there was actually a high amount of bird activity for it being a cold and blistery day.

My birds were all grouped up and while, not chatting they were chirping back and forth. There are many audio clues that were audible including danger calls and warnings to, me the potential predator. I saw a Black-capped Chickadee as well as a Northern Cardinal, they each have an advantage in different ways. The chickadee can blend into the environment and is better at surviving predators, while the cardinal's color helps it to attract mates and show dominance.

While walking to the woods I encountered multiple American Robins all of whom looked like they were angry they came up this early to find Vermont still very cold. They did not appreciate the pishing. One thing that I noticed was their warning calls were social, each bird responded and when I got closer it got louder and a faster speed. Also it felt like the male robins were flying out in front of me attempting to distract me or something along those lines, they flew right in front of me just out of my reach multiple times. I am curious if they were attempting to protect any females or were they just playing a game with each other to see who could get closest to me.

While pishing I did feel rather foolish, and I am not very good at getting wildlife, especially birds, to do what I want alas it seemed to startle most of the chickadees I got near. However some of them where able to overcome the beard and forbearing posture and they came to see what in the world I was doing. The first times I tried to do it they flew away in fear but the time it worked they were curious about what I was doing. While pishing I tried to dig into the shhh sound and almost whistled it to sound more bird like.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por tomdemouth tomdemouth | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Mediterranean or Woo's Katydid ?

Discovered that the Mediterranean katydid katydids (Phaneroptera nana) that I found in the summer and fall of 2019 in my Lakeland patch might be a new subspecies or perhaps even a new species, Woo's katydids (Phaneroptera nr. nana). Brandon Woo, who is studying these insects) even included a few of my INat observations in the Singing Insects of North America (SINA). My thumb, visible as I held one of them for a picture, is now famous. SINA lists Woo's katydids separately from Mediterranean katydids.

I collected three nymphs from the site in December. They've since morphed into adults--two females and a male. The male sings at night when the lights are off. He makes a faint chip that I initially thought was the Giant Katydids feet clicking against the screen. I need to send my videos with the songs to Brandon.

I collected two green and one brown nymph. All three are now green.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por lizch lizch | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Observation Tip: Improving Photographs

Including a photograph (or audio recording) with your iNaturalist observation is key. Without it, the observation will not become "research grade" and eligible for use in many scientific studies!

Here are some quick tips to help improve your photographs so that you and other iNaturalist users can better identify the organisms you find:

1. Get closer. The more of your subject that fills the frame, the better detail your picture will have. Use macro lenses or shooting modes (often signified by a small flower icon on digital cameras) for small subjects, get close to a plant or fungi, or zoom in on wildlife. Make sure to use common sense when deciding whether or not to approach an animal. If you have any doubts, don’t approach it.

2. Take multiple photos. Take more than one photo to capture different views and parts of your subject. Sometimes small details necessary for making an identification are not visible from a single angle. Try taking pictures of leaves, bark, stems, flowers, and other plant parts, or photograph an animal or fungi from multiple angles, such as above, to the side, and underneath.

3. Take photos that are in focus. While blurry photos can be a fun challenge for making an identification, it is far easier to identify an organism when the photos are in focus and show the organism in crisp detail.

4. Add something for scale. In many cases, providing a size reference will help confirm an identification. Size references are especially useful for tracks, since many tracks can look similar in photos and it can be challenging to judge size based on the track alone. A size reference uses any object that most people know the approximate size of, such as a coin, glove, ruler, or hiking pole. You can also describe size in the comments section if necessary.

Thanks to the staff at Vermont Center for Ecostudies for putting together this more detailed article on improving photographs, accessible here: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/vermont-atlas-of-life/journal/30529-tech-tip-tuesday-improving-photographs

You can also check out this short video on how to take better photographs for iNaturalist: https://vimeo.com/167341998

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por slamonde slamonde | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Recent Shifts in CNC Events

Most of us are stuck at home as we do our part to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Because of the seriousness of the pandemic, many City Nature Challenge events have been canceled. Yet, you can still participate! With a few modifications, you can safely connect with nature and each other during these difficult times. This is a opportune moment for exploring and documenting nature in and around your home (be sure to obscure your location in the Geoprivacy settings), and for increasing the quality of nature observations by verifying or suggesting taxonomic identifications. These two activities combined will allow us to make a strong showing as first-year City Nature Challenge participants. Now more than ever, it's important to foster a sense of community, and the City Nature Challenge allows us to do just that. :)

Tips for Exploring Around Your Home: https://drive.google.com/open?id=14X-10q6qzG48ny40_1VIt8gx6FO8IhHz

COVID-19 FAQs: https://citynaturechallenge.org/covid19/

Inland Empire CNC Contact: cncinlandempire@gmail.com, @breeput

@dvanoverbeke , @aaron_echols, @ianbernstein, @ehyatt, @cvalenzuela, @michaelmax, @seanrichards, @emilyyrae, @jmdc, @ashleyloth, @zacktippie, @chemartin, @sarahv3, @thatbean, @slothasarousrex, @jj1417, @jmdc2, @gabynunez, @andrewgoodman, @zachsmith2, @thomasabenson

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por breeput breeput | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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265 000 !!!

Дорогие друзья!
Наступили самые неожиданные выходные столетия. Правда, настигли они всех нас при драматических и непредсказуемых обстоятельствах. В европейской части России стоит тёплая погода. Например, 28 марта этого года стал рекордно тёплым днём за всю историю метеонаблюдений в Москве. Как и в прошлый раз, каждый день в нашем проекте появляется почти тысяча новых наблюдений. Каждый день мы видим новых участников и новые виды. Каждый день добавляются новые подписчики. Итак, на счётчике очередная круглая цифра: 265 000 наблюдений в проекте "Флора России". Для очередной пятитысячной отметки нашему сообществу потребовалось 5 суток и 6 часов - ровно столько же, сколько и в прошлый раз. За эти дни число наблюдателей флоры России подскочило сразу на 52 человека (10 новичков в сутки!), а число выявленных и подтверждённых видов увеличилось на 44 таксона.
Уже 160 человек за последние пять с половиной дней вышли на улицу, сделали наблюдения в природе и успели загрузить их на iNaturalist. В этот раз доля свежих полевых наблюдений составила 34% против 66%, поступивших из ранних архивов пользователей.
Другая традиционная статистика. С 1.01.2020 по 26.03.2020 в поле сделано 10 616 наблюдений. В эти же дни, но годом ранее (1.01.2019 по 26.03.2019) было сделано в природе только 776 наблюдений. Невероятно, но факт: нам с вами, дорогие друзья, удаётся уже два месяца удерживать показатели 14-кратного (точнее, в 13,68 раз!) роста данных в 2020 году против прошлого года! В какой-то момент (пару дней назад) статистика чуть просела до 13-кратных значений, но сегодня всё встало на свои места. Это вновь демонстрирует, что борьба в зачёте регионов обостряется!
Как уже стало привычным, давайте снова зафиксируем статистику для истории.
265 000 наблюдений наш проект достиг 28 марта 2020 г. около 17:00 MSK.
The project reached 265,000 observations in 28 Mar 2020 about 17:00 MSK.
Статистика проекта / Project stats:
265,148 observations - 6,280 species - 2,141 identifiers - 4,150 observers
Статистика антипроекта / Anti-project stats:
28,388 observations - 2,921 species - 694 identifiers - 2,169 observers
С прошлого замера проект вырос на 5,1 тыс. наблюдений, а антипроект подрос на 0,7 тыс. наблюдений.
Из вновь загруженных за пять с половиной дней наблюдений больше всего звёздочек одобрения в результате голосования пользователей получила захватывающая фотография новосибирского энтузиаста iNaturalist Алексея Зырянова (@alzov). На сей раз это наблюдение из Горного Алтая двухлетней давности. Это Pinus sylvestris (сосна обыкновенная) - самый часто снимаемый вид флоры России! Не стесняйтесь ставить лайки другим интересным наблюдениям и самым удачным фотографиям. Это развивает чувство взаимного интереса и товарищеской конкуренции, что очень важно в наступающем сезоне всеобщей самоизоляции.
В качестве небольшого приза я хочу прорекламировать проект, который Алексей самостоятельно придумал и воплощает. Это биоблиц "1000 детских шагов". Два майских дня школьники будут документировать биоразнообразие в радиусе 500 метров от своих школ. К проекту уже присоединилось 29 школ и клубов из России и Белоруссии. Алексей делает ставку на подрастающее поколение, на деле возрождая движение юных натуралистов в цифровую эпоху. Подумайте, может и вам удастся кого-то привлечь к этому?

1. Самые активные участники (число наблюдений) | Top-observers (number of observations)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
1 @apseregin 17386 1583
2 @velibortravoved 10236 669
3 @panasenkonn 9891 1012
4 @taimyr 5731 779
5 @vladimir_teplouhov 4944 426
6 @convallaria1128 4901 1349
7 @melodi_96 4842 770
8 @dni_catipo 4669 698
9 @eduard_garin 4644 766
10 @julia_shner 4285 582
11 @npz 4130 505
12 @dryomys 3883 665
13 @pavel_golyakov 3807 787
14 @ledum 3623 993
15 @sokolkov2002 3162 650
16 @phlomis_2019 3148 1088
17 @olga2019kuryakova 3126 489
18 @max_carabus 2837 442
19 @vvolkotrub 2802 1263
20 @katerina_kashirina 2641 747
21 @svetlanakutueva 2611 459
22 @borisbolshakov 2553 517
23 @alzov 2422 608
24 @olegdavydov 2415 346
25 @prokhozhyj 2288 476
26 @ramazan_murtazaliev 2202 1432
27 @hapugin88 2192 512
28 @mallaliev 2134 919
29 @vadim_prokhorov 2104 792
30 @aleksandrebel 2024 762
31 @naturalist16000 1912 585
32 @evgenyboginsky 1899 356
33 @denis_tishin 1806 404
34 @divitre 1762 368
35 @birdchuvashia 1704 563
36 @alexeiebel 1696 531
37 @smsergey 1691 432
38 @beerolha 1619 487
39 @kildor 1590 538
40 @sesquicentennial 1577 505

2. Самые активные участники (число видов) | Top-observers (number of species)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
1 @apseregin 17386 1583
2 @ramazan_murtazaliev 2202 1432
3 @convallaria1128 4901 1349
4 @vvolkotrub 2802 1263
5 @phlomis_2019 3148 1088
6 @panasenkonn 9891 1012
7 @ledum 3623 993
8 @mallaliev 2134 919
9 @svdudov 1442 869
10 @vadim_prokhorov 2104 792
11 @pavel_golyakov 3807 787
12 @taimyr 5731 779
13 @melodi_96 4842 770
14 @eduard_garin 4644 766
15 @aleksandrebel 2024 762
16 @katerina_kashirina 2641 747
17 @lenatara 1532 732
18 @dni_catipo 4669 698
19 @ggularijants 1186 674
20 @velibortravoved 10236 669
21 @dryomys 3883 665
22 @sokolkov2002 3162 650
23 @alzov 2422 608
24 @naturalist16000 1912 585
25 @julia_shner 4285 582
26 @birdchuvashia 1704 563
27 @gen_ok 1221 552
28 @kildor 1590 538
29 @alexeiebel 1696 531
30 @borisbolshakov 2553 517
31 @hapugin88 2192 512
32 @npz 4130 505
33 @sesquicentennial 1577 505
34 @olga2019kuryakova 3126 489
35 @beerolha 1619 487
36 @tomegatherion 1355 487
37 @antennaria 966 477
38 @prokhozhyj 2288 476
39 @dinanesterkova 1081 472
40 @dakileno 1139 469

3. Статистика региональных проектов (наблюдения) | Regional projects' stats (observations)

Место | Rank Проект | Project Наблюдений | Observations
1 Флора Москвы | Flora of Moscow 26966
2 Флора Подмосковья | Moscow Oblast Flora 19549
3 Флора Брянской области | Bryansk Oblast Flora 13658
4 Флора Алтайского края | Altai Krai Flora 13354
5 Флора Чувашии | Chuvash Republic Flora 11926
6 Флора Нижегородской области | Nizhny Novgorod Oblast Flora 10747
7 Флора Ярославской области | Yaroslavl Oblast Flora 9566
8 Флора Омской области | Omsk Oblast Flora 8989
9 Флора Камчатки | Kamchatka Flora 7694
10 Флора Курской области | Kursk Oblast Flora 6894
11 Флора Татарстана | Tatarstan Flora 6424
12 Флора Красноярского края | Krasnoyarsk Krai Flora 5942
13 Флора Крыма | Flora of the Crimea 5742
14 Флора Костромской области | Kostroma Oblast Flora 5577
15 Флора Новосибирской области | Novosibirsk Oblast Flora 5570
16 Флора Воронежской области | Voronezh Oblast Flora 5466
17 Флора Приморского края | Primorsky Krai Flora 5449
18 Флора Калининградской области | Kaliningrad Oblast Flora 5181
19 Флора Дагестана | Dagestan Flora 4525
20 Флора Владимирской области | Vladimir Oblast Flora 4163
21 Флора Севастополя | Sevastopol Flora 4070
22 Флора Краснодарского края | Krasnodar Krai Flora 3835
23 Флора Иркутской области | Irkutsk Oblast Flora 3221
24 Флора Башкирии | Bashkortostan Flora 3216
25 Флора Самарской области | Samara Oblast Flora 3165
26 Флора Калужской области | Kaluga Oblast Flora 2952
27 Флора Свердловской области | Sverdlovsk Oblast Flora 2823
28 Флора Тверской области | Tver Oblast Flora 2808
29 Флора Санкт-Петербурга | St Petersburg Flora 2800
30 Флора Сахалинской области | Sakhalin Oblast Flora 2613
31 Флора Мордовии | Flora of Mordovia 2518
32 Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora 2331
33 Флора Томской области | Tomsk Oblast Flora 2281
34 Флора Тульской области | Tula Oblast Flora 2247
35 Флора Республики Алтай | Altai Republic Flora 2124
36 Флора Волгоградской области | Volgograd Oblast Flora 2036
37 Флора Ленинградской области | Leningrad Oblast Flora 2015
38 Флора Белгородской области | Belgorod Oblast Flora 2002
39 Флора Кировской области | Kirov Oblast Flora 1956
40 Флора Карачаево-Черкесии | Flora of Karachay-Cherkessia 1876
41 Флора Архангельской области | Arkhangelsk Oblast Flora 1809
42 Флора Тюменской области | Tyumen Oblast Flora 1721
43 Флора Кемеровской области | Kemerovo Oblast Flora 1513
44 Флора Мурманской области | Murmansk Oblast Flora 1448
45 Флора Саратовской области | Saratov Oblast Flora 1385
46 Флора Липецкой области | Lipetsk Oblast Flora 1340
47 Флора Амурской области | Amur Oblast Flora 1246
48 Флора Ульяновской области | Ulyanovsk Oblast Flora 1196
49 Флора Удмуртии | Udmurt Republic Flora 1184
50 Флора Югры | Flora of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug 1147
51 Флора Бурятии | Buryat Republic Flora 1076
52 Флора Челябинской области | Chelyabinsk Oblast Flora 1056
53 Флора Ямало-Ненецкого АО | Flora of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug 999
54 Флора Карелии | Flora of Karelia 984
55 Флора Чукотки | Flora of Chukotka 788
56 Флора Хакасии | Flora of Khakassia 779
57 Флора Псковской области | Pskov Oblast Flora 778
58 Флора Рязанской области | Ryazan Oblast Flora 767
59 Флора Новгородской области | Novgorod Oblast Flora 726
60 Флора Пермского края | Perm Krai Flora 687
61 Флора Тамбовской области | Tambov Oblast Flora 644
62 Флора Адыгеи | Flora of Adygea 577
63 Флора Ставрополья | Stavropol Krai Flora 556
64 Флора Пензенской области | Penza Oblast Flora 472
65 Флора Вологодской области | Vologda Oblast Flora 456
66 Флора Коми | Komi Republic Flora 383
67 Флора Забайкальского края | Zabaykalsky Krai Flora 377
68 Флора Курганской области | Kurgan Oblast Flora 363
69 Флора Кабардино-Балкарии | Flora of Kabardino-Balkaria 345
70 Флора Ивановской области | Ivanovo Oblast Flora 330
71 Флора Оренбургской области | Orenburg Oblast Flora 328
72 Флора Смоленской области | Smolensk Oblast Flora 312
73 Флора Якутии | Flora of Yakutia 272
74 Флора Астраханской области | Astrakhan Oblast Flora 155
75 Флора Марий Эл | Mari El Flora 151
76 Флора Тувы | Tyva Republic Flora 141
77 Флора Чечни | Chechen Republic Flora 102
78 Флора Магаданской области | Magadan Oblast Flora 85
79 Флора Орловской области | Oryol Oblast Flora 79
80 Флора Хабаровского края | Khabarovsk Krai Flora 58
81 Флора Ненецкого АО | Flora of Nenets Autonomous Okrug 56
82 Флора Северной Осетии | Flora of North Ossetia 55
83 Флора Ингушетии | Flora of Ingushetia 28
84 Флора Калмыкии | Flora of Kalmykia 28
85 Флора Еврейской АО | Flora of Jewish Autonomous Oblast 1

4. Статистика региональных проектов (виды) | Regional projects' stats (species)

Место | Rank Проект | Project Видов | Species
1 Флора Дагестана | Dagestan Flora 1589
2 Флора Приморского края | Primorsky Krai Flora 1342
3 Флора Крыма | Flora of the Crimea 1168
4 Флора Алтайского края | Altai Krai Flora 1074
5 Флора Брянской области | Bryansk Oblast Flora 1056
6 Флора Подмосковья | Moscow Oblast Flora 1016
7 Флора Краснодарского края | Krasnodar Krai Flora 1009
8 Флора Москвы | Flora of Moscow 1009
9 Флора Воронежской области | Voronezh Oblast Flora 963
10 Флора Татарстана | Tatarstan Flora 916
11 Флора Красноярского края | Krasnoyarsk Krai Flora 914
12 Флора Нижегородской области | Nizhny Novgorod Oblast Flora 912
13 Флора Курской области | Kursk Oblast Flora 906
14 Флора Камчатки | Kamchatka Flora 811
15 Флора Ярославской области | Yaroslavl Oblast Flora 793
16 Флора Костромской области | Kostroma Oblast Flora 769
17 Флора Севастополя | Sevastopol Flora 767
18 Флора Свердловской области | Sverdlovsk Oblast Flora 766
19 Флора Владимирской области | Vladimir Oblast Flora 762
20 Флора Чувашии | Chuvash Republic Flora 753
21 Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora 726
22 Флора Новосибирской области | Novosibirsk Oblast Flora 715
23 Флора Иркутской области | Irkutsk Oblast Flora 704
24 Флора Сахалинской области | Sakhalin Oblast Flora 691
25 Флора Карачаево-Черкесии | Flora of Karachay-Cherkessia 654
26 Флора Омской области | Omsk Oblast Flora 651
27 Флора Калининградской области | Kaliningrad Oblast Flora 616
28 Флора Волгоградской области | Volgograd Oblast Flora 614
29 Флора Тверской области | Tver Oblast Flora 614
30 Флора Башкирии | Bashkortostan Flora 613
31 Флора Республики Алтай | Altai Republic Flora 611
32 Флора Томской области | Tomsk Oblast Flora 603
33 Флора Архангельской области | Arkhangelsk Oblast Flora 587
34 Флора Белгородской области | Belgorod Oblast Flora 577
35 Флора Мордовии | Flora of Mordovia 567
36 Флора Кемеровской области | Kemerovo Oblast Flora 566
37 Флора Калужской области | Kaluga Oblast Flora 563
38 Флора Тульской области | Tula Oblast Flora 556
39 Флора Бурятии | Buryat Republic Flora 522
40 Флора Ленинградской области | Leningrad Oblast Flora 515
41 Флора Самарской области | Samara Oblast Flora 507
42 Флора Санкт-Петербурга | St Petersburg Flora 484
43 Флора Кировской области | Kirov Oblast Flora 473
44 Флора Амурской области | Amur Oblast Flora 457
45 Флора Тюменской области | Tyumen Oblast Flora 447
46 Флора Липецкой области | Lipetsk Oblast Flora 438
47 Флора Югры | Flora of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug 403
48 Флора Удмуртии | Udmurt Republic Flora 397
49 Флора Саратовской области | Saratov Oblast Flora 379
50 Флора Ульяновской области | Ulyanovsk Oblast Flora 379
51 Флора Псковской области | Pskov Oblast Flora 368
52 Флора Челябинской области | Chelyabinsk Oblast Flora 362
53 Флора Хакасии | Flora of Khakassia 341
54 Флора Адыгеи | Flora of Adygea 337
55 Флора Новгородской области | Novgorod Oblast Flora 322
56 Флора Пермского края | Perm Krai Flora 320
57 Флора Мурманской области | Murmansk Oblast Flora 317
58 Флора Рязанской области | Ryazan Oblast Flora 309
59 Флора Ставрополья | Stavropol Krai Flora 305
60 Флора Карелии | Flora of Karelia 299
61 Флора Тамбовской области | Tambov Oblast Flora 264
62 Флора Забайкальского края | Zabaykalsky Krai Flora 262
63 Флора Чукотки | Flora of Chukotka 262
64 Флора Ямало-Ненецкого АО | Flora of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug 255
65 Флора Пензенской области | Penza Oblast Flora 254
66 Флора Вологодской области | Vologda Oblast Flora 244
67 Флора Ивановской области | Ivanovo Oblast Flora 220
68 Флора Курганской области | Kurgan Oblast Flora 209
69 Флора Кабардино-Балкарии | Flora of Kabardino-Balkaria 208
70 Флора Смоленской области | Smolensk Oblast Flora 208
71 Флора Якутии | Flora of Yakutia 197
72 Флора Оренбургской области | Orenburg Oblast Flora 186
73 Флора Коми | Komi Republic Flora 179
74 Флора Тувы | Tyva Republic Flora 123
75 Флора Марий Эл | Mari El Flora 115
76 Флора Астраханской области | Astrakhan Oblast Flora 105
77 Флора Чечни | Chechen Republic Flora 88
78 Флора Орловской области | Oryol Oblast Flora 65
79 Флора Магаданской области | Magadan Oblast Flora 57
80 Флора Северной Осетии | Flora of North Ossetia 53
81 Флора Хабаровского края | Khabarovsk Krai Flora 53
82 Флора Ненецкого АО | Flora of Nenets Autonomous Okrug 38
83 Флора Ингушетии | Flora of Ingushetia 27
84 Флора Калмыкии | Flora of Kalmykia 16
85 Флора Еврейской АО | Flora of Jewish Autonomous Oblast 1

5. Топ-наблюдатели за 5,5 дней (наблюдения в поле) | 5,5-days top-observers (field observations)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
1 @apseregin 256 137
2 @dryomys 193 36
3 @max_carabus 130 28
4 @dni_catipo 106 45
5 @taimyr 69 40
6 @vladimir_teplouhov 69 26
7 @velibortravoved 60 34
8 @aleks-khimin 57 24
9 @melodi_96 41 28
10 @npz 34 26
11 @panasenkonn 31 28
12 @ikskyrskobl 30 13
13 @julia_shner 27 21
14 @sesquicentennial 21 11
15 @valeria_reshetnikova 21 13
16 @yuriydanilevsky 19 18
17 @dinanesterkova 17 15
18 @krasnova18 15 14
19 @naturalist26231 15 9
20 @mrsalento 14 11
21 @naturalist16000 14 12
22 @sergeystakanov 14 11
23 @cambala 13 13
24 @eduard_garin 12 11
25 @pavel116 12 11
26 @viktoriaf 12 11
27 @irinakharlamova 11 11
28 @ledum 11 6
29 @emelyanov_dmitriy 9 9
30 @konstantinseliverstov 9 9
31 @nastiy 9 9
32 @alebedev 8 8
33 @vist 8 8
34 @zibzap 8 5
35 @a-lapin 7 5
36 @denis_tishin 7 7
37 @eriksultan_svg 7 4
38 @ivanovdg19 7 7
39 @lianarebrova2011 7 6
40 @ilya_murashev 6 3

6. Топ-поставщики наблюдений за 5,5 дней (поле + архив) | 5,5-days top-uploaders (field & archives)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Наблюдений | Observations Видов | Species
1 @dni_catipo 733 353
2 @taimyr 304 69
3 @gen_ok 272 206
4 @apseregin 256 137
5 @ledum 184 120
6 @maxim_ismaylov 132 73
7 @pyakai 116 112
8 @sapsan 100 81
9 @anna_efimova 96 86
10 @vladimirov 87 54
11 @rovzap 85 57
12 @vladimir_teplouhov 69 26
13 @sergejseleznev 67 54
14 @korobkov 63 21
15 @dryomys 52 24
16 @stsenator 50 48
17 @ocanire 47 42
18 @zefirka 45 34
19 @gennadiy 43 42
20 @melodi_96 42 29
21 @mihail13 42 41
22 @prokhozhyj 42 34
23 @max_carabus 40 21
24 @npz 38 28
25 @aleks-khimin 37 19
26 @velibortravoved 37 25
27 @vist 37 16
28 @aleksandrebel 35 33
29 @alzov 35 22
30 @julia_shner 33 23
31 @sokolkov2002 32 23
32 @andrewins 31 25
33 @panasenkonn 31 28
34 @ikskyrskobl 26 19
35 @valeria_reshetnikova 24 14
36 @lupus_imperium 19 19
37 @tanja45 19 18
38 @yuriydanilevsky 19 18
39 @chibi 18 14
40 @pavel116 18 15

7. Самые активные эксперты для наблюдений загруженных за 5,5 дней (поле + архив) | Top-experts for the last 5,5 days uploads (field & archives)

Место | Rank Пользователь | User Определений | IDs
1 @phlomis_2019 2370
2 @madmanserg 661
3 @julia_shner 451
4 @aleks-khimin 431
5 @lenatara 417
6 @convallaria1128 411
7 @melodi_96 326
8 @taimyr 293
9 @borisbolshakov 260
10 @svg52 156
11 @sesquicentennial 148
12 @kastani 114
13 @aleksandrebel 107
14 @mitchella_1 106
15 @gennadiy 102
16 @dinanesterkova 88
17 @prokhozhyj 78
18 @daba 69
19 @apseregin 63
20 @katerina_kashirina 50
Для написания данного поста использован конвертер текстовых и табличных данных, который осуществляет разметку текста. Конвертер разработал Константин Романов (@kildor). Если у вас есть свои проекты, то вам эта ссылка, уверен, пригодится!
Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por apseregin apseregin | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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March 6th: Ecological Physiology

It is indeed still winter, this Tuesday the 3rd of March was a blistery day with clear gray skies. At around 12:30 pm I went out to our beloved centennial woods. I went all the way to the commuter lot and was going into the farthest entrance to be among the conifers. While I was on my way there, still in sight of the Doubletree, I heard the soft cawing of an American crow, it was rather far away flying through the air heading northeast.
I wanted to head this way because it was an area with a lot of conifers and it also has a large opening for the telephone/electricity poles that run through it. The conifers because during the winter they are used to host the birds, sheltering them from the snow and rain. It also allows the birds to retain more body heat while hunting for seeds and winter berries. American Crow's might not have the same affiliation to conifers as the smaller birds do. The Black-capped Chickadee I saw later in the walk relies on them more.
As I walked through this part of the woods there are many many snags, the first one not 60 feet from the trail. It was an older snag the tree missing all the bark and there were many cavities, on just one side it had 16 cavities. All of the cavities were small and round looking like the same animal or same species made them. After this snag there were 11 more I saw along my walk, each showed signs of cavities made by a similar animal.
Snags are extremely important in terms of wildlife, as well as general forest health. They provide habitat to many insect species and help provide food for larger organisms, such as birds. The snags also eventually fall turning into downed woody debris which is important for similar reasons. As well as helping the forest retain nutrients, carbon, and can even be a nursery log for species such as yellow birch. Woodpeckers are a great example of birds that can use snags to feed and nest. Other animals use these cavities to nest as well as bats.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por tomdemouth tomdemouth | 2 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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濱海植物及其耐鹽機制

海岸闊葉灌叢群系_地被植物
水龍骨科>擬茀蕨屬>海岸擬茀蕨(Phymatosorus scolopendrium)
特徵:根莖直徑0.5cm,羽片不超過8對,對生或近對生,寬2~2.5cm,脈不顯著,網眼内具游離小脈,羽片末端短尖至漸尖,羽軸連翅寬1.5~3cm。
分佈:西、南太平洋至法屬波利尼西亞,生長在沿海石礫地,或近山區的礁、山溝等地,除了海邊礁石外,濱海的石礫地或山溝附近也常出現。
iNat分佈: Singapore,Indonesia,Thailand,Taiwan,Australia,Mariana Islands,Mananara....etc
機制:根莖發達,分歧性高,表層具黑色鱗片。分泌離層素使葉子脫落,減少蒸散作用。

參考:
1.台灣先生天然植群圖鑒,pg124
2.http://kplant.biodiv.tw/%E6%B5%B7%E5%B2%B8%E6%93%AC%E8%8C%80%E8%95%A8/%E6%B5%B7%E5%B2%B8%E6%93%AC%E8%8C%80%E8%95%A8.htm
3.http://subject.forest.gov.tw/species/vascular/1/index-1.htm
4.https://blog.xuite.net/e2202778/boaboa/21792284-%E6%B5%B7%E5%B2%B8%E6%93%AC%E8%8C%80%E8%95%A8

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por horngshianngan horngshianngan | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Photographed Sequence of Events

In the natural world, there are regular animal behaviors that occur, for example a small bird harassing a larger bird. In this journal entry I will attempt to outline those behaviors that likely occur in Florida, that I am aware of, that interest me, and also encourage myself to seek out those I am not familiar with. This journal entry will allow me to take an inventory of what I have photographed and have already uploaded as an observation, along with those I aspire to capture. Parentheses around the Class of animal indicates I have at least one posted observation of this behavior.

Amphibian.....Frog catching prey with its tongue

(Bird)…………...Anting
(Bird)…...……...Bird chasing down another to steal its prey
Bird.........……...Loggerhead Shrike impaling Prey on a spike
Bird...…………...Nighthawk doing a steep dive
Bird...….........….Osprey catching a Fish from the water
Bird...……………Peregrine Falcons migration stop in the Keys
(Bird)...…...…...Short Tailed Hawk diving for Prey
Bird...…....……..small Bird harassing a larger one

Fish...…………….Mullet Run
(Fish)...……..….Shark temporarily beaching its pursuing prey

(Insect)....…….Butterfly Puddling
Insect...….…….Monarchs migrating

(Mammal)…..Dolphin jumping from the water

Reptile...………Alligator doing a Water Dance
Reptile...……...Alligator thrusting itself from the water to capture a Bird on a branch
Reptile......……Lizard catching Prey with its tongue
(Reptile)...…...Lizard changing from one color to another
(Reptile)...…...Rattlesnake shaking its rattle
Reptile...……...Sea Turtle laying eggs on the beach

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por arthur-windsor arthur-windsor | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Quarantine wildflower hike

During the covid-19 pandemic, Erin and I took a day off and went out to the desert to check out the wildflowers. It hasn't been an extraordinary year for wildflowers, and we're probably past peak, but we found what I thought was a good diversity of flowers. Desert marigold was the showiest and perhaps the most abundant flower, along with the smaller pincushions in the genus Chaenactis. It was an overcast day: good flat lighting for documentary photos but not for prize-winning images. We hiked the Sendero Esperanza trail from the parking to the ridge where it meets up with the Hugh Norris Trail. Not many butterlies out and about.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por scottolmstead scottolmstead | 41 observaciones | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Oakledge Park March 27, 2020 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

After driving back to VT from MD I wanted to spend some time outside and not in the car. It was a beautiful afternoon, around 51 degrees and sunny with an 11 mph wind. With Covid- 19 causing closings I wasn't sure if Oakledge Park was still going to be open but it was packed! Oakledge has a nice main walking path with sparse trees that leads to a small beach area. While there are a few other paths, I stayed in the sunlit beach path.

No birds were wading in Lake Champlain while I walked along the beach. The wind was causing the water to have white caps which could have led to there being no geese or ducks. In the trees lining the path, there weren't any birds I could see. The people of Burlington were keeping Oakledge park lively this Friday afternoon which might have kept some birds away.

Walking back towards the car was when I saw the first bird. There was a gull soaring solo above the main park walkway. I couldn't hear it making a call so it wasn't making any vocal communications with other gulls. I did notice the black wings tips on the Gull which can help cool the bird's wings. The heat is concentrated on the feather surface and then taken away by the wind.

By the car, there was a small clearing close to the edge of a wooded area. In the clearing, I could hear a lot of bird calls from various species. I couldn't see any of them and the recording I took was very poor. The birds were most likely calling because of the heavy traffic of pedestrians walking through the woods. Calls are normally used to alert birds of possible threats.

The second and last bird I saw looked like an American Crow but was too far away from me to accurately ID without binoculars. I'm terrible at ID-ing birds during walks but I guess the more walks I go on the better I'll get! The Blackbird was perched on a branch but wasn't resting. It kept messing with its wings so I can assume that it was grooming itself.

After, watching the blackbird for a little bit I left Oakleadge park around 6:30 pm. I only saw 2 birds on my walk: the Gull and the Blackbird.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por madilong madilong | 2 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Rooftop Shoe-birdfeeder: Surprise Party

Over time, it was interesting (and surprising) to watch other feathered friends arrive - House Finch, White-crowned Sparrow, California Towhee, California Scrub-Jay and even the American Crow.

However, over the rainy season, I discovered and learnt more about the "poop-shrooms" - Phycomyces. The shoe-birdfeeders turned pretty soggy and dirty very quickly, to a point I had to get rid of them. Still, the experiment was great while it lasted.

Ingresado el 28 de marzo de 2020 por linzyl linzyl | 12 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Social Behavior

Time- 3:00-4:30 PM Date- 3/27/2020 Location- around my neighborhood in Wantagh, NY Weather- 70 Fahrenheit, sunny and clear, no wind Habitat- open fields and suburban trees Wow, this trip around my block was an unexpected surprise. Upon reading the prompt i thought I would struggle with this assignment because I am typically bad at the deep observation required to notice social interactions. However, I did not need to deeply observe at all, it presented its self. Immediately after walking out of my house I spotted a group of about 5 House Sparrows all chasing a leader, nosily singing the whole time. Though I cannot say for sure, I expect the 5 followers to be vying for a mate (the leader). Although March may be a little early to begin nesting, I suspect the unseasonably warm temperatures may drive some individuals to mate earlier. This assumption was later solidified when I spotted a pair of House Sparrows hanging out near a partially completed nest. This pair provided additional insights as well; while the 2 nesting pair were perched peacefully and quietly, the sparrows in the neighboring tree were all calling, presumably trying to attract a mate. I observed similar behavior in a group of European Starlings where 3 were perched and a 4th came over singing. The 2 of the birds went out to intercept the intruder and began singing back until the intruder chased them off. He then perched next to the only remaining starling. I suspect the two that were chased off were fighting over a mate when the 4th starling chased them off to claim her as his own. Additionally, I spotted a lone Northern Mockingbird perched on a house singing his heart out. The fact that he was alone and singing in such a visually obvious place leads me to believe he was trying to find a mate. As for non-mating related communication, the cacophony of songs got much louder when the Red-tailed Hawk soared over heard. This was most likely the birds warning each other of a predators presence. Blue Jays are bright blue and white and considerably larger then the brown and black House Sparrow. The Blue Jay's call also significantly stands out more, being one deep tone as opposed to a series of high pitches notes strung together. Examining their life history reveals why this might be. Blue Jays are much bigger birds and therefore better able to defend themselves from predators. It is not a big deal if a hawk spots a blue jay because the hawk will most likely go for smaller prey, like a House Sparrow. Being small, dark colored and having a song that makes you difficult to locate allows House Sparrows to remain out of the claws of a predator. As for the pishing activity, I pished my heart out but got no reaction, most likely because of my location. My neighborhood is directly next to one of the most major highways on Long Island so the birds are used to constant noise. However, I do have a hypothesis as to why pishing sometimes draws attention. I believe the pishing sounds imitate that of the flapping wings in a predatory bird. The birds hear a pish, which they believe is a predator so they investigate it.
Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por benjaminrosen benjaminrosen | 10 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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100 SPECIES! (and a summary)

I'm celebrating our 100th tree band species today. Maybe that shouldn't be a celebration, now that I think of it. For the record, this included North Carolina firsts for 16 species (7 beetles, 1 syrphid, 1 sawfly, 2 spiders, 1 psyllid, 1 moth, 1 ichneumonid, 1 collembolan, and 1 leafhopper). The collembolan, Prorastriopes wexfordensis, was a world iNat 1st (and 1st record for BugGuide) as was the zopherid beetle a world iNat 1st (Hyporhagus punctulatus). Needless to say, if you put Tanglefoot traps over a couple hundred trees or so you're going to trap (and unfortunately kill) a lot of bugs.

Sometimes I sample haphazardly, sometimes I make a count. Adding up days when I counted the trees I looked at during an outing this season, I've seen just 8 Fall Cankerworms on 102 banded trees.

-Ken

Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por kenkneidel kenkneidel | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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An Amateur Naturalist in Greece Posts the first Silene integripetala plant to iNaturalist - Observation of the Week 3/27/20

Our Observation of the Week is the first Silene integripetala plant posted to iNaturalist, by @katerinakalogerini in Greece!

Katerina Kalogerini resides in a small seaside town in southeastern Peloponnese, a region of Greece, where she teaches history and the Greek language, and tells me “I have been in love with animals and nature for all my life.

As a little girl I used to enjoy walks with my father in nature. He would stop from time to time to show me a bird on a tree (he used to love birds!), a turtle, a plant or a flower and every time it was a pure joy for me to discover a piece of the beauty of nature with his help. We both used to love the sea also, so during summer we were looking for fish, crabs, etc. while snorkeling together. He wanted to show me as many species as possible. Maybe the most beautiful memories of my childhood…

She came across her first Silene integripetala three years ago, and says “I found it so beautiful that l was determined to find out its name. After hours of searching on the internet l discovered it on www.greekflora.gr. The joy was even greater when l read that the flower is endemic of southern Peloponnese, where I live.” The plant you see photographed throughout this post was observed a few weeks ago while Katerina looked for orchids, and she says “It was the first integripetala of the year for me! When I found out there were no observations of the flower on iNaturalist, I decided to make this the first one.”

Plants in the genus Silene are known commonly as catchflies and campions in English, and according to Intermountain Flora (vol. 2A, p. 447. 2012)

Internodal bands on some Silene stems exude a sticky sap that may trap small insects, thus the common name “catchfly.” The plant cannot utilize nutrients from these trapped insects and is therefore not carnivorous. The function may be to prevent crawling insects from reaching the flowers.

Catchflies are cosmopolitan, but are more abundant in the northern hemisphere, and the genus contains around 700 species. 

Perhaps hearkening back to her childhood, Kateria (above, on Cyprus) still calls snorkeling and walking through nature among her favorite experiences, and says “I am fascinated every time l find a new species to me!” She uses iNaturalist to get identification help, and has some ambitions for it:

I want to post as many species of my area as possible. My town, Neapoli Lakonias, is located at the southeastern end of continental Europe and there are quite a few endemic species here, mostly plants, some of which I hope to find and post on iNaturalist one day.

By Tony Iwane. Some quotes have been lightly edited for clarity and flow. Thanks to @jdmore for the quote from Intermountain Flora.


- There are nearly 40,000 Silene observations on iNaturalist, so why not take a look at them?

- Silene is part of the Caryophyllaceae (pinks/carnations) family, and iNat data from Caryophyllaceae was used in this study of anther-smut records.

- And really, who can forget Marty Robbins’ classic song of heartbreak involving a pink carnation?

Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por tiwane tiwane | 8 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Mapping Recovery with the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden Update – 3/27/20

Hi community scientists,

I hope that you and your loved ones are staying safe and healthy. Things are changing rapidly in our state, and we decided earlier this month to postpone all remaining classroom and field trainings related to the Mapping Recovery project. Though the Garden is closed to visitors, we’re continuing to perform our critical conservation work as much as possible but are making some changes to improve our safety and reduce our risk of spreading disease. In light of these changes and the Governor’s stay-at-home order, we wanted to share with you some updates about the Mapping Recovery project and ways that you can continue to be a community scientist while maintaining your safety and comfort.

As volunteers for this project, we want you to know that the US Forest Service has decided to limit access to its offices, and that all campgrounds and facilities are currently closed (see attached press release). However, trails remain open, and most health experts agree that exercise outdoors is safe for low-risk groups. If you choose to continue surveying your trail, we ask that you abide by the following:
- Do not leave home if you are feeling ill or show any symptoms of COVID-19 or any other contagious diseases
- Maintain a minimum of a 6-foot distance between yourself and other trail users. Please move to the side in a safe place to allow other users to pass you, or politely ask them to make space for you to pass.
- A reminder before you head out: facilities (including restrooms) are closed on all US Forest Service trails. Please avoid touching surfaces (drinking fountains, benches, signage) whenever possible.
- Don’t invite others to hike with you. Under normal circumstances, I would love for you to share your survey efforts with others, but at this time, it’s best to hike only with those you live with and interact with on a daily basis.
- If possible, visit the trail during off hours – trails have been particularly impacted over weekends as many of us enjoying stretching our legs after being cooped up for a week. However, large congregations on trails are unsafe for both disease transmission, and because it can contribute to trail damage.
- In a similar vein, if you cannot find parking at the trailhead, reconsider your hike. Trails in other places have been closed due to large numbers of visitors, and we’d like to avoid this happening in here.

I also want to add that if you need to drop out of this project for any reason, I fully support your decision to do so, and appreciate it if you could let me know. This is a difficult time for all of us for a variety of reasons, and I don’t want anyone to feel pressured to hike and survey for this project if they are not comfortable to or able to do so.

And now, for some good news: our project is taking off, and we’ve been getting some much-needed rain! We have an incredible 466 plant observations on iNaturalist and 537 erosion, trail damage, weedy area, and landscape monitoring photo observations in AnecData. Keep ‘em coming – and remember to add close up photos of plant parts (flowers, leaves, etc.) whenever possible to improve the chances that I (or someone else) can ID your photo at home.

Also exciting: the project materials are now available online! If you’ve misplaced your ID guide or protocol booklet, they’re on the following webpage (https://www.sbbg.org/conservation-research/fire-recovery-community-science/community-scientist-resources).

As spring creeps further, here are some weeds to keep an eye out for: the fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis) are getting quite large, the sticky snakeroot (Ageratina adenophora), and tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) are both in flower (and easier to spot!) in many places. This is also the time to catch Onionweed (Asphodelus fistulosus). And remember to keep your eyes peeled for areas of potential erosion, like this gnarly eroded gully spotted by user teacups.

There are also plenty of other species getting spotted on local trails – for example, check out this awesome native Scarlet Monkeyflower (Erythranthe cardinalis) spotted by user ezeemonee, and this lovely rare Ojai Fritillary (Fritillaria ojaiensis) spotted by user georgewilliams1!

That’s all from me for now, and I hope to update you again in the next few weeks. Stay safe and healthy, and I look forward to seeing more observations come in through iNaturalist and AnecData! For those of you waiting on the rare species list – keep your eyes peeled, as that will arrive in your inboxes later today. All the best until the next update!

Josie

Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por castillejajosie castillejajosie | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Field Journal 4

Around 2 pm. Clear, blue sky day, about 60 degrees. Area has a few spaced out trees, mostly open with prairie grass. There were a few of these birds flying low to the ground in the prairie grass. I think it is a song sparrow but I'm not positive.

I heard black-capped chickadee calls with different number of "dee"s at the end. The calls were sort of coming from different areas so there were multiple but I could only see one (the picture I got was too bright to see the bird in it). When I walked below the tree the chickadee was in I noticed that the "dee"s increased by one or so, and then it would fly to a farther branch or different tree all together. The, I believe song sparrows, in the the prairie grass would sort of fly/jump through the grass low to the ground. when one would go by the one in the picture would crane its head around a bit. They would also call back and forth.

The plumage of the birds I saw very much resembled the coloring of what they would rest in. The bird pictured was hard to pick out among the grass until I saw it fly and then land. Even when I was taking videos/pictures I struggled to spot the bird through my camera lens. I saw a few birds with dark slate color on the back of the bird. When it was flying I could see the birds white underbelly and dark back relatively clearly. However when it rested on a tree branch the color on the back of the bird was very close to the color of the tree bark and the bird almost melted away from sight. This makes sense as these birds are very small and probably rely on cammoflage for protection from predators.

The bird with the darker color on its back was primarily higher up in the trees. In this setting the bird was incredibly hard to see as it blended in with the bark color nicely. If the bird that was primarily in the prairie grass was in the trees it would stick out against the even dark color. However in the prairie grass, the varied brown colors let it melt away into the prairie grass habitat. For context the grass was adjacent to the cluster of trees. Geographically the two habitats were very close together.

I also observed a kildeer fly through the spaced out trees. It sort of weaved in and out of the of the trees almost like a figure eight on a tilt.

Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por helen235 helen235 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Winter Conditions

Birds have a high metabolism, so they generate a substantial amount of heat. They also have a lot of down feathers that provide insulation in the winter. In addition to the insulation that their down provides, the uropygial gland that secrets an oil that birds coat their feathers with for water protection. On their legs they have scales that minimize heat loss.

Behaviorally, they have a few adaptations to keep warm. Birds will do something called fluffing where birds fluff up their feathers to create air pockets for extra insulation. Birds will also tuck their bill into their shoulder to breathe in warm air. They will also stand on one leg or crouch over both legs to keep them warm. Birds will also sun on a sunny day. They will turn their backs to the sun and angle their feathers to soak up the warmth from the sun. Like humans, birds will also shiver if they need to generate heat in extreme conditions. Small birds will often gather at night to sleep together to share body heat, called roosting. Birds will also enter torpor during winter nights, lowering their body temperature by as much as 50 degrees to conserve energy.

While I was walking I was mostly in an open area with few trees so I did not see too many snags, but I may have seen one with a few holes in it.

Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por helen235 helen235 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Join Our River Team

If you can safety (observing Social Distancing) make observations on local rivers, we'd love to have you on our new Rivers Team. Those interested should contact Bruce Bodson of the Lower Brazos River Watch at bruce.bodson@lowerbrazosriverwatch.org. For general questions about the Houston-Galveston City Nature Challenge Team please contact Jaime González at jaime.gonzalez@tnc.org.

Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por habitat_jaime habitat_jaime | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Observations of the Month: Owl's-Clover (Orobanchaceae)

Purple Owl’s-Clover (Castilleja exserta subsp. exserta) https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/40729470 by jrebman
Parish’s or Graceful Owl’s-Clover (Castilleja densiflora subsp. gracilis) https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/39212245 by jrebman

In San Diego County, we have two kinds of Owl’s-Clover that are annuals with mostly pinkish-purple inflorescences: Purple Owl’s-Clover (Castilleja exserta subsp. exserta) and Parish’s or Graceful Owl’s-Clover (Castilleja densiflora subsp. gracilis). Both plants are widespread in our county, but Castilleja exserta subsp. exserta is more common and ranges farther inland than Castilleja densiflora subsp. gracilis. When you examine either of these plants, it can be difficult to figure out the parts of the flowers. Forget easily recognized structures like petals and sepals. Instead, you need to become conversant with lips and beaks.

The 5 petals of each of these two taxa are fused, forming corolla lips. One of the more obvious features of the plants are the shorter, pouch-like, 3-lobed lower corolla lips that are usually pinkish below and white with yellow and darker purplish markings at the top. In Castilleja exserta subsp. exserta this lip is rather subdued, but in Castilleja densiflora subsp. gracilis the lower corolla lip is widened and appears to bulge out. (Occasionally, you may find “albino” plants with the pinkish parts replaced with white, but usually those plants are mixed in with more typically colored ones.)


(L) Castilleja exserta subsp. exserta (R) Castilleja densiflora subsp. gracilis © Jon Rebman

The beak is the fusion of the 2 upper petals and in both of these species is pinkish and projects above the lower corolla lip. In Castilleja exserta subsp. exserta the beak is “shaggy hairy” and is hooked at the end and the stigma appears to be perched below the hook. In Castilleja densiflora subsp. gracilis the beak is much less hairy, straight, and the stigma appears to be perched at the tip.

When you post an observation of one of these plants, be sure to include a close-up, side view photo of the beak and corolla lip as the first photo in the observation for ease of identification.

Ingresado el 27 de marzo de 2020 por milliebasden milliebasden | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario
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Vida Silvestre es una entidad asociada a la Organización Mundial de Conservación