Jack Wallace FJ3 - Centennial Woods Natural Area

Location: Centennial Woods Natural Area South Burlington, VT
Time: 4:15- 5:45 PM
Date: Sunday, March 7th
Temperature: 25-30 Degrees F
Weather: Sunny and clear
Wind: 5 mph
Habitat: Mix of hilled forest and flat wetlands

During this journal exercise, I was able to spot numerous species of birds. The first bird I saw was the Northern Cardinal. When I first spotted them, both birds (M+F) were roosting together inside of a pretty thick bush. This could have been to help retain body heat. By staying together in thick brush cover, this could have possibly helped to keep both of them warmer. Unfortunately while moving around to get a better look, both of the birds took off.

Because of my timing, the sun was going down and I think this attributed to the lack of birds that I could see. When we first arrived and were walking on the east side of the woods, we could see birds like the Black-capped Chickadee and the two Northern Cardinals, however as the sun continued to go down we saw less birds and heard less calls and songs. Looking over to the west part of the forest, I realized that the sun was still illuminating the tops of the trees over there. We walked over to see if more birds would be in the sunlight and sure enough on that side the forest was full of bird calls and songs. Almost all of them were in the tops of the trees and for the most part standing still. Because of this, I think the birds were soaking up the last bit of warmth from the sun to reserve energy for the cold night ahead. Throughout this time, the occasional flock of 2-4 crows would fly over heading North. This is due to an adaptation of American Crows to roost together in a big flock to help retain body heat and reserve energy.

While walking around looking for more birds, I made sure to be aware of dead snags and the holes that were in them. After watching a small Brown-headed Nuthatch peck its way up the skinnier branches, I attributed he small surface holes in the bark to these birds. I found it apparent that the older/more dead looking snags had the larger cavities in them. This could be attributed to the softer nature of the wood which would make It easier for birds to peck out a hole in search of bugs, or a hole to make a home out of. The tinier holes were always found in the more lively part of a dying tree, or just a hanging branch from a fully alive tree.

When walking up the hill on the west side of the forest, I noticed many small red berries scattered in the snow. Most of them were directly under the tree that they came from, but all of them has been opened up and the branches were way too delicate to support and bird larger than a Black-capped Chickadee. In these patches of opened berries I found the tracks of a Ruffled Grouse. It seemed that this bird was scavenging the ground for berries picked off by smaller birds. This is defiantly a seasonal attribute for these birds when food is scarce in the winter.

Over all this was a pretty successful period of observation even without the use of binoculars. Next journal I will go out much earlier in the day and I hope to see more activity below the canopy.

Publicado por jwally325 jwally325, 08 de marzo de 2021

Observaciones

Fotos / Sonidos

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Carpintero Velloso-Menor Dryobates pubescens

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Marzo 7, 2021

Descripción

On our way out of the woods my friend caught the moment of two Downy Woodpeckers at the very top of a tree jumping around. It appeared to be one male and one female. Both of them would take some time pecking on one part of the trunk, hop up a few feet and begin pecking up there. Their movements were very sporadic. I caught it on video but since they were so far away it is hard to tell that they are Downy Woodpeckers.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Carpintero de Cresta Dryocopus pileatus

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Marzo 7, 2021

Descripción

We were unable to find this bird in the canopy, however we prominently heard its call ring out numerous times throughout our walk. At first I mistaken this call for that of a King Fisher, but once I got to my computer and looked up some sounds it was apparent that this was the call from the Pileated Woodpecker. In addition to its call we were able to hear the drumming from it pecking at a tree.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Grévol Engolado Bonasa umbellus

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Marzo 7, 2021

Descripción

When walking around I spotted these bird tracks in the snow. At first glance I figured they were Turkey tracks, however they were way too small and close together to be from a bird that size. My next thought was that they could have been from an American Crow. Once I looked through my phone and realized these footprints were Tridactyl and did not have a prominent 4th phalange like that of an American crow, I realized it must have been the tracks from a Ruffed Grouse.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Carbonero de Capucha Negra Poecile atricapillus

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Marzo 7, 2021

Descripción

First observed two hopping from branch to branch on the tops of this one tree. They seemed to be following each other. After spotting two Northern Cardinals, I stepped farther into some brush and two different Black-capped Chickadees flew right infant of me and landed on the branch about two feet from my face. These were the only 4 we spotted the whole time but throughout the observation time we heard them in the tree canopy.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Cuervo Norteamericano Corvus brachyrhynchos

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Marzo 7, 2021

Descripción

The entire time we where in the woods American Crows were flying over. They all appeared to be flying towards Lake Champlain and they would usually appear in pairs or with 3 to 4 birds.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Qué

Cardenal Rojo Cardinalis cardinalis

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Marzo 7, 2021

Descripción

Right as we walked in to the entrance to Centennial Woods we were greeted with two Northern Cardinals (M+F) in a bush next to the trail. I wasn't fast enough to grab my camera because by the time we spotted them they were getting ready to take off. Once I startled them they flew away and landed on a house near by. I found it interesting how the many times I have seen Cardinals, they always seem to be in a couple.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Pájaros Orden Passeriformes

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Marzo 7, 2021

Descripción

From a distance I was able to spot a Brown-headed Nuthatch. At first I heard a faint drumming and figured I was hearing some type of Woodpecker. Once I spotted the movement I could see its gray back as it was upside-down on the trunk of a tree. It was pecking at the bark but not nearly as aggressive as the pecking movements you see from a Woodpecker. After watching it for a while I was able to get a semi clear photo of it as it momentarily perched on a branch.

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Vida Silvestre es una entidad asociada a la Organización Mundial de Conservación