FJ7: Reproductive Ecology and Evolution - Jack Wallace

Date - April 24, 2021
Start time -4:00 PM
End time -6:00 PM
Location -North Beach Park Burlington, VT
Weather (temperature, wind speed/direction, precipitation) - Partly Cloudy, 0-3 knots of wind W/NW, 55-60 Degrease F
Habitat(s) -Waterfront beach, grassy field, marsh, small forest.

When we arrived to North Beach the sun had started to go behind the clouds however it still remained very bright out. There was no wind and the lake was perfectly flat. Walking down the path to the beach American Robins were scattered all over the grass. They would hop around a little, pick at the grass and eventually fly away with something in their mouth. Walking a little farther we reached the wooded part of the park near the playground. When walking in there we saw a bird fly across our path and land on a tree branch. After walking around to get a better look we realized it was a Downy Woodpecker. It let us get surprisingly close as it hopped up and down the tree limb before flying off. On the other side of the woods is the marsh part of the park. Right when we got there the only bird call I kept hearing was that of the Red-winged Blackbird. Sitting on the tops of Cattails were about 8-10 Red-winged Blackbird that would make their call, fly off to the edge of the woods, and then after a while back to the Cattail. Additionally we were able to see a large Turkey Vulture hanging in the thermals above the park. We watched it do a few circles before we realized it had 2 American Crows flying after it. They seemed to be trading off diving down on it but oddly enough the Vulture seemed unfazed.

All of the Red-winged Blackbirds appeared to be nesting together in the relatively small patch of marsh. Red-winged Blackbirds keep their nests close to the ground/water, so it seemed like the males for each nest stayed on the top of the cattail above their nest in order to protect their eggs. Their calls seemed to just be a general warning that they where there to protect their nest. The Females were not visible since they tend to jump around closer to the ground in the marsh grass. In contrast to the Red-winged Blackbird, the American Robin seemed to be more comfortable leaving its nest. The Robin prefers nesting off the ground and because of that they need to bring nesting material to their preferred location in a tree. That is what we were witnessing, the Robins were picking through the grass for dry strong pieces of grass to weave into a nest.

Publicado por jwally325 jwally325, 26 de abril de 2021

Observaciones

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Cuervo Norteamericano Corvus brachyrhynchos

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 24, 2021

Descripción

Saw it chasing a vulture.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Carpintero Velloso-Menor Dryobates pubescens

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 24, 2021

Descripción

Walked off to the wooded part of the park and right away a Downy Woodpecker flew across our path and onto a brach of a nearby tree. We were able to get pretty close and watch him hop up and down the branch before he quickly took off.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Mirlo Primavera Turdus migratorius

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 24, 2021

Descripción

The entire time we were there we saw robins scattered all throughout the grassy part of the park hopping around and picking up loose grass.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Jote Cabeza Colorada Cathartes aura

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 24, 2021

Descripción

Got this photo of a Turkey Vulture floating in the thermals above the park while being harassed by two American Crows.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Tordo Sargento Agelaius phoeniceus

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 24, 2021

Descripción

Once we walked back to the marshy area of the park behind the playground, every few seconds you could hear the call of Red-winged Blackbirds. When we got there there were 8+ Red-winged Blackbirds siting on the tops of cattails.

Comentarios

No hay comentarios todavía.

Agregar un comentario

Acceder o Crear una cuenta para agregar comentarios.
Vida Silvestre es una entidad asociada a la Organización Mundial de Conservación