Jack Wallace Field Observation: Migration 04/04/2021

Location: Centennial Woods Natural Area South Burlington, VT
Time: 1:15- 2:45 PM
Date: Sunday, April 4th
Temperature: 52-54 Degrees F
Weather: Partly cloudy

Wind: 10 mph - 15 mph
Habitat: Mix of hilled forest and flat wetlands

Upon arrival to the woods the first bird I heard and recognized was the Black-capped Chickadee. It seems that every time I do one of these field journals no matter the time of day or year, I am able to see or hear the Black-capped Chickadee. When observing them during the day, they are constantly moving from branch to branch foraging for small berries and whatever else they can find. There ability to forage defiantly contributes to their winter survival. In addition to this, I learned that they are very effective at lowering their body temperature at night which helps them conserve heat energy. This is another very important adaptation that contributes to their winter success.

I was lucky enough to spot an American Goldfinch during my time in the woods. I was surprised to see it, because usually at my home in Connecticut I don't see them until mid spring/summer. Because of this I figured they migrated farther south during the winter, but when I did some research today I was surprised to find that their yearly range goes into southern Canada! From what I have read, it seems that the Goldfinch follows a facultative migration pattern where they migrate depending on the food availability in their range. Because of this, they can migrate north of their range were people have seen them in northern Ontario. The Goldfinch I saw was a male due to its bright yellow pattern. Goldfinches are one of the latest nesters in the area and this could have attributed to why I saw a male out and about.

Unfortunately, I did not encounter any birds who's wintering range doesn't cover Northern VT. In order to do the mini activity, I focused on the American Goldfinch, which can commonly be found wintering in Florida as well as Vermont. Because of this, the Goldfinch I saw could possibly have flown 1,750 miles from southern Florida all the way to Burlington for the spring!

Publicado por jwally325 jwally325, 05 de abril de 2021

Observaciones

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Jilguerito Canario Spinus tristis

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 4, 2021

Descripción

Was able to spot this little guy perched up on a branch of a dead tree that was standing in the marshy area of the woods. It was hard to get a good photo since he was pretty high up and directly in the sun, however in the picture you can make out the silhouette of his body on the branch.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Pato Norteño Anas platyrhynchos

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 4, 2021

Descripción

Spotted a male and female Mallard paired together bobbing in the creek. I was able to get close enough to take this picture through the trees without them flying off.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Carbonero de Capucha Negra Poecile atricapillus

Observ.

jwally325

Fecha

Abril 4, 2021

Descripción

The entire time I was in the forest I could hear chickadees. It was hard to spot them or take a picture due to the fact that they were jumping from the tops of the pine trees.

Comentarios

No hay comentarios todavía.

Agregar un comentario

Acceder o Crear una cuenta para agregar comentarios.
Vida Silvestre es una entidad asociada a la Organización Mundial de Conservación